Development of An Optimal Cleaning Process Through ICM

By Dr. Jay Glasel

  • Development of An Optimal Cleaning Process Through ICM

Cleaning processes consist of a number of manual and/or automatic steps involving the use of mechanical action, solvents, and/or detergents. In practice, current cleaning processes are usually based on historical methods that lack an integrated scientific approach. A scientific approach to cleaning should include advances in scientific knowledge of how contaminants stick to surfaces, and what must be done to remove them. Lacking a scientific approach, the usual cleaning processes are more time-consuming and expensive than they should be. By applying ICM principles to cleaning, optimized cleaning processes can be developed in a methodical and logical way. As a consequence, these optimized processes can meet the upcoming demand for better quality, faster processes, cost reduction and the quest for a healthier environment.
As a general process that has been practiced by humans for many millennia, traditional cleaning has depended on tools (for example, mechanical mopping) that have advanced insofar as the materials they are made from, but not in their basic use. In particular, the efficacy of cleaning has traditionally been judged on whether the surfaces that have been cleaned?'look clean' to the naked eye. Moreover, the cleaning methods that have traditionally been used have not been based on the physics and chemistry of the contamination to be removed.
This lack of appreciation of the detailed nature of surface contamination is understandable: The basic analytical understanding of how non-microbial contamination interacts with surfaces is a development of the last 70-80 years. It is now known that in some cases non-microbial particles and other contaminating substances and microbials are held to most surfaces by some of the strongest attractive chemical and physical forces that exist outside of the subatomic world.
For soils, including both inorganic (e.g. metal and mineral particles) and organic (e.g. oils and plant and animal products) contamination there are several physical forces that operate. The attractive physical forces include positive and negative electrical charge interactions, and other strong forces that must be explained by quantum mechanics applied to close molecular interactions (for example, the so-called 'van der Waals forces').
For microbial contamination, it must be realized that the existence of microbials was unknown 125 years ago, and scientists are still in the process of learning how microbials attach to surfaces. Some of the same forces that attached non-microbial particles to surfaces play roles in microbial attachment but, in addition, scientists are learning that chemical attractions of types not fully understood are also present. For example, there are bacteria that can attach to a glass or plastic surface with a force so strong that if it were translated to a 1 cm2 surface area, it could support a car the size of a Volkswagen!
The method that underlies the advances that have taken place in the physical and biological sciences is based on integrating past quantitative knowledge into new knowledge acquired by measured quantitative outcomes of experiments. Applied to cleaning, this means that determination of the efficacy of a new cleaning process cannot depend on a qualitative measurement such as 'looking clean'. This is especially true for microbial contamination because all microbials are much too small to be seen by the human eye without a microscope.
The basic premise of ICM is that development of an optimal cleaning process for any environment must go hand-in-hand with quantitative measurements that determine how effective each cleaning step is. That is, the effectiveness of cleaning processes must be validated by experimental measurements. The practical implementation of ICM therefore requires the availability of instruments capable of measuring amounts of both microbial and non-microbial contamination on the surfaces to be cleaned.
Fortunately, scientific and technological developments have taken place within the last few decades that allow the quantitative measurements of amounts of contamination present on surfaces before and after application of a cleaning procedure. The instruments that allow these measurements to be done have grown simpler and less expensive during these decades. At present, many instruments for use in monitoring cleaning efficacy that originally were bulky and confined to laboratories and were extremely costly and difficult to use now are in production for sale in the hundreds of dollars per instrument range and, in some cases, are hand-held. These instrumental developments will certainly continue for the forseeable future.
The introduction of the science of ICM into the field of cleaning private, public, and corporate spaces is a logical extension of highly effective cleaning and disinfection protocols developed over the past 40 years in the pharmaceutical, electronics, and optical industries. These cleaning protocols have allowed manufacturers in these industries to maintain product production in rooms where contamination levels for both microbials and non-microbials are many orders of magnitude less than even the cleanest ordinary room. While the cleaning protocols that are developed using ICM are not meant to address reduction of contamination to these low levels, the same basic scientific principle is used: any cleaning process must be validated by measurements of contamination levels before and after a cleaning step.
About the Author:


Dr. Glasel is the Managing Member and Founder of Global Scientific Consulting, LLC. He is a Professor Emeritus in the Department of Microbial, Molecular and Structural Biology at the University of Connecticut Medical/Dental School in Farmington, Connecticut. He has lectured and done research in many countries in Europe and Asia.

 

Dr. Glasel's scientific research has been in the fields of structural biochemistry, molecular immunology, pharmacology, and cell biology. Major portions of the research involved the structure and properties of water and aqueous solutions and on the structural chemistry and molecular biology of opiates and opiate peptides. He pioneered the uses of anti-morphine monoclonal antibodies and anti-opiate receptor anti-idiotypic antibodies in research on the cellular effects and actions of narcotics.  

 

Dr. Glasel is co-editor and an author for the Academic Press textbook 'Introduction to Biophysical Methods for Protein and Nucleic Acid Research' and many other contributed book chapters and original scientific research articles.
Dr. Glasel obtained a B.S. in chemistry and physics from Caltech. His Ph.D. from the University of Chicago was in chemical physics for work on chemical reactions on comets. He has served on active duty in the U.S. Air Force as a nuclear research officer.

Related Topics

Related Products

  • Trash Compactor ManualKaiVac 1250 No-Touch Cleaning® System

    When it comes to restrooms and other heavily soiled areas, nothing beats Spray-and-Vac cleaning. Kaivac's No-Touch Cleaning systems are built for extreme soil removal, empowering workers to clean hygienically without touching contaminated surfaces. Plus, it cuts labor, chemical and equipment costs. Achieving great, consistent results is easy with these patented systems. Simply apply automatically diluted cleaning solution to fixtures and floors in a low pressure fan spray, and then rinse surfaces and floors with always-fresh, clean water. The built-in power of the indoor pressure washer flushes soils out of grout lines and tight places that mops can't reach. Finally, just vacuum the floor dry -- completely removing soils, moisture and contaminants from all surfaces, grout lines and crevices, leaving the floor virtually dry and soil free. The Kaivac 1250 is ideal for smaller areas. It boasts a 12 gallon fresh water and a 12 gallon recovery tank. The system is powered by a 500 p.s.i. pump and a powerful 3-stage wet/dry vacuum.

  • Trash Compactor ManualKaiVac 1750 No-Touch Cleaning® System

    When it comes to restrooms and other heavily soiled areas, nothing beats Spray-and-Vac cleaning. Kaivac’s No-Touch Cleaning systems are built for extreme soil removal, empowering workers to clean hygienically without touching contaminated surfaces. Plus, it cuts labor, chemical and equipment costs. Achieving great, consistent results is easy with these patented systems. Simply apply automatically diluted cleaning solution to fixtures and floors in a low pressure fan spray, and then rinse surfaces and floors with always-fresh, clean water. The built-in power of the indoor pressure washer flushes soils out of grout lines and tight places that mops can’t reach. Finally, just vacuum the floor dry -- completely removing soils, moisture and contaminants from all surfaces, grout lines and crevices, leaving the floor virtually dry and soil free. The Kaivac 1750 is perfect for areas large and small. It boasts a 17 gallon fresh water and a 17 gallon recovery tank. The system is powered by a 500 p.s.i. pump and a powerful 3-stage wet/dry vacuum.

  • Trash Compactor ManualKaiVac 2750 No-Touch Cleaning® System

    When it comes to restrooms and other heavily soiled areas, nothing beats Spray-and-Vac cleaning. Kaivac’s No-Touch Cleaning systems are built for extreme soil removal, empowering workers to clean hygienically without touching contaminated surfaces. Plus, it cuts labor, chemical and equipment costs. Achieving great, consistent results is easy with these patented systems. Simply apply automatically diluted cleaning solution to fixtures and floors in a low pressure fan spray, and then rinse surfaces and floors with always-fresh, clean water. The built-in power of the indoor pressure washer flushes soils out of grout lines and tight places that mops can’t reach. Finally, just vacuum the floor dry -- completely removing soils, moisture and contaminants from all surfaces, grout lines and crevices, leaving the floor virtually dry and soil free. The largest of the No-Touch Cleaning systems, the Kaivac 2750 is perfect for big facilities with high capacity needs. It features a 27 gallon fresh water tank, 500 PSI pump, 3-stage vacuum and the industry’s longest spray line and vacuum hose.

  • Trash Compactor ManualOmniFlex™ Dispense-and-Vac Space Saver

    Kaivac offers a compact version of its multiple award-winning OmniFlex Dispense-and-Vac system. Just like the original, this "no-mop" system offers a simple, fast approach to cleaner, safer floors. Plus, its compact size and extreme maneuverability make it ideal for congested areas with tight storage space. Like most Kaivac systems, it's up to 60 times better at removing soil and contaminants than mopping and significantly faster too. To operate, simply open the spigot and apply fresh cleaning solution to the floor, spread and lightly brush into grout lines. Then, just vacuum all soils and liquid away, leaving floors really clean and bone dry. It's perfect for daily cleaning and degreasing commercial floors. The process is radically better, faster and safer than mopping. Click here to see the original OmniFlex Dispense-and-Vac system.

Privacy Policy Terms of Service Return Policy
© 2001 - 2018 Kaivac, Inc.
Close

Cart

Item removed. Undo